Posted in Alex, Built, Gaming, Olie, Papa

Warhammer modular board 3×3 (part 2)

You remember my little Part 1 for this built…

Summary of the previous episode: cut foam, sculpt foam, paint, glue the grass and foliage… (Long story, VERY short…). I have been asked how we put the grass, so I will give you a bit more details this time: dilute some glue and spread it, using a brush, on the zones where you want your grass to grow. 

You can do it little by little, in small areas, no need to cover the whole tile at one go. Sprinkle generously the fake grass and wait for a while, the fibers must absorb some of the glue (a minute or 2 are enough). Then, you shake the excess on a newspaper (in order to be able to gather and re-use it later). You can do the whole board like that, and then arrange your bushes, trees and others features!


Over the river, we built some little bridges with toothpicks and glue, so the warriors would be able to cross without getting wet…


So, basically, we had our 9 tiles ready and looking like a nice little part of the Shire. I noticed that the boards didn’t stay together very well, and knowing my zouzous, this would mean the game would be quite messy in just a few minutes. I therefore looked for an idea to stabilise all this. Magnets came to my mind (after all, they can be put together and separated quite easily), and I looked into this. As you know, magnets have a positive and a negative side (“North” and “South”), and it was not a good thing when you want to position the boards in a number of configurations: what if 2 South were in front of each other? The board would have moved on its own… not good…

That’s when it stroke me: if each tile side has a positive on the left AND a negative side on the right, they would always attract each other, regardless of the position of the juxtaposed tile…

I’m not sure I am very clear here, but hopefully you will understand in a few minutes… (if not, drop me a line, I’ll explain)

Basically, I needed magnets. Lots of magnets. 9x4x2=72 to be precise. As usual, we went to Daiso, and bought 75 magnets for $10… ok, they came in colourful and decorative plastic shells, but with a good pair of plyers and a bit of patience, we ended up with the magnets alone.


Now, please take your magnets and mark all the positive sides (or negative, I’ve never been able to tell them apart…). Whatever side you chose, you must mark the SAME side on every single magnet. A good trick is to stick all of them together, and, starting on one side of the “worm”, mark the side that is at the edge. You remove that magnet and do the same on the next one, and so on…


Now, on the side of each tile, trace a line in the center and mark 2 spots, exactly 2.5cm away from each edge.


Make a whole on each spot and place 2 magnets: one with the positive side up on he right, and one with the negative side up on the left. Repeat this on every side of each tile, and be careful not to invert your magnets!!

Once everything is in place, you just have to cover the sides of the tiles with a nice piece of duct tape, that will not only hold the magnets into place, but also give your tiles a nicer finish than the raw foam…


Once in a while, confirm that the tiles are ok and attract each other when placed side to side. The tiles come into place together, but you can remove them easily. This should be perfect for a nice game.


On the sides with the river, i cut the tape so the light can go through the “water”.


And on the sides with mountains, I added some tape at the back of the rocks to complete the finish.


And there you have it!!! Once this tedious process is completed on all 9 tiles, you can put them together in any configuration you want and start to play!!! Hope you have a good time!!!

As for us, the kids need to finish painting their armies before we can really enjoy a game! A little more patience, and we will be there!

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Author:

Originally from the North of France, I have great fun doing illustrations and drawing Nutons... happy Husband and Father of 3 teenage boys, we make things, props, and live a geek life in Singapore.

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